We Recommend

The Last Days of Rabbit Hayes, by Anna McPartlin
Anna McPartlin

Here is a truth that can't be escaped: for Mia "Rabbit" Hayes, life is coming to and end. Rabbit Hayes loves her life, ordinary as it is, and the extraordinary people in it. She loves her spirited daughter, Juliet; her colorful, unruly family; the only man in her big heart, Johnny Faye. But it turns out the world has other plans for Rabbit, and she's okay with that. Because she has plans for the world too, and only a handful of days left to make them happen. Here is a truth that won't be forgotten: this is a story about laughing through life's surprises and finding the joy in every moment.

Advice for Future Corpses (and Those Who Love Them), by Sallie Tisdale
Sallie Tisdale

An exploration of our fears and all the ways death and talking about death makes us uncomfortable – but also its intimacies and joys. Tisdale looks at grief, what the last days and hours of life are like, and what happens to dead bodies. She includes exercises designed to make you think differently about the inevitable, and practical advice, personal experience, a little Buddhist philosophy, and stories. But this isn't a book of inspiration or spiritual advice. It is about how you can get ready and you can start by admitting that we are all future corpses.

The Further Chronicles of Sherlock Holmes, by Denis O. Smith
Denis O. Smith

From the curious clauses in a miser's will, to a plea for help on a tiny scrap of paper, these six cases, from the early years of Holmes's career in the 1880s, present a singular collection of mysteries for the world's first consulting detective to resolve. In this new collection of Sherlock Holmes short stories, Sherlock Holmes must find the answers to these and many other puzzling questions if he is to bring these cases to a successful conclusion. 

100 Nature Hot Spots in British Columbia, by Lyndsay Fraser
Lyndsay Fraser

This book features 100 destinations in BC for nature lovers, from national parks to regional conservancies to beautiful trails. The authors discuss the features of each destination as well as the natural histories of the animals found there.

The Mars Room, by Rachel Kushner
Rachel Kushner

A spectacularly compelling, heart-stopping novel about a life gone off the rails in contemporary America. It's 2003 and Romy Hall is at the start of two consecutive life sentences at a correctional facility in California. Outside is the world from which she has been severed: of her youth and her young son, Jackson. Inside is a new reality: thousands of women hustling for the bare essentials needed to survive; the bluffing and pageantry and casual acts of violence by guards and prisoners alike; and the deadpan absurdities of institutional living, which Kushner evokes with great humor and precision. 

Alone on the Ice: The Greatest Survival Story by David Roberts
David Roberts

On January 17, 1913, alone and near starvation, Douglas Mawson, leader of the Australasian Antarctic Expedition, was hauling a sledge to get back to base camp. The dogs were gone, and he plunged through a snow bridge, dangling over an abyss by the sledge harness. A line of poetry gave him the will to pull himself back to the surface, and on February 8, when he staggered back to base, his features unrecognizably skeletal, the first teammate to reach him blurted out, "Which one are you?."

Thomas King

DreadfulWater is the unlikely Cherokee ex-cop who's trying to make a living as a photographer in the small town of Chinook, somewhere in the northwestern United States. Smart and savvy, blessed with a killer dry wit and a penchant for self-deprecating humor, DreadfulWater isn't sure that he can shed his California cop skin. Soon entangled in a mystery that involves a smart-ass teenage anti-condo protester and a cast of characters as weird and wonderful as his own enigmatic personality, DreadfulWater has his work cut out for him.

Ria Brodell

Katherina Hetzeldorfer, tried "for a crime that didn't have a name" (same sex sexual relations) and sentenced to death by drowning in 1477; Charles aka Mary Hamilton, publicly whipped for impersonating a man in eighteenth-century England; Clara, aka "Big Ben," over whom two jealous women fought in 1926 New York: these are just three of the lives that the artist Ria Brodell has reclaimed for queer history in Butch Heroes. Brodell offers a series of twenty-eight portraits of forgotten but heroic figures, each accompanied by a brief biographical note.

Diane Setterfield

A dark midwinter's night in an ancient inn on the Thames. The regulars are entertaining themselves by telling stories when the door bursts open on an injured stranger. In his arms is the drowned corpse of a little child. Hours later the dead girl stirs, takes a breath and returns to life. Is it a miracle? Is it magic? Or can it be explained by science? Once Upon a River is replete with folklore, suspense and romance, as well as the urgent scientific curiosity of the Darwinian age.

Ben Macintyre

Traces the story of Russian intelligence operative Oleg Gordievsky, revealing how his secret work as an undercover MI6 informant helped hasten the end of the Cold War.

David Whitehouse

A deeply moving, tragicomic adventure about a boy who escapes his small town in a stolen library on wheels in search of freedom, friendship, and, most of all, family.

Robert Macfarlane

Are there any genuinely wild places left in Britain and Ireland? That is the question that Robert Macfarlane poses to himself as he embarks on a series of breathtaking journeys through some of the archipelago's most remarkable landscapes. He climbs, walks, and swims by day and spends his nights sleeping on cliff-tops and in ancient meadows and wildwoods. With elegance and passion he entwines history, memory, and landscape in a bewitching evocation of wildness and its vital importance.

California Dreamin' , by Pénélope Bagieu
Pénélope Bagieu

Before she was the legendary Mama Cass of the folk group The Mamas and the Papas, Ellen Cohen was a teen from Baltimore with an incredible voice, incredible confidence, and incredible dreams. She dreamed of being not just a singer but a superstar. So, at the age of nineteen she left her hometown and became Cass Elliot. She found an unlikely group of co-conspirators, and in their short time together this bizarre and dysfunctional band recorded some of the most memorable songs of their era. Through the whirlwind of drugs, war, love, and music, Cass struggled to keep sight of her dreams, of who she loved, and –  most importantly – who she was.

Vindolanda, by Adrian Goldsworthy
Adrian Goldsworthy

AD 98: The bustling army base at Vindolanda lies on the northern frontier of Britannia and the entire Roman world. In twenty years' time, the Emperor Hadrian will build his famous wall, but for now defences are weak, as tribes rebel against Roman rule, and local druids preach the fiery destruction of the invaders. Flavius Ferox is a Briton and a Roman centurion, given the task of keeping the peace on this wild frontier. But it will take more than just courage to survive life in Roman Britain.

Vindolanda, by Adrian Goldsworthy
Adrian Goldsworthy

AD 98: The bustling army base at Vindolanda lies on the northern frontier of Britannia and the entire Roman world. In twenty years' time, the Emperor Hadrian will build his famous wall, but for now defences are weak, as tribes rebel against Roman rule, and local druids preach the fiery destruction of the invaders. Flavius Ferox is a Briton and a Roman centurion, given the task of keeping the peace on this wild frontier. But it will take more than just courage to survive life in Roman Britain.

Circe, by Madeline Miller
Madeline Miller

Follows Circe, the banished witch daughter of Helios, as she hones her powers and interacts with famous mythological beings before a conflict with one of the most vengeful Olympians forces her to choose between the worlds of the gods and mortals.

 Calypso, by David Sedaris
David Sedaris

With Calypso, Sedaris sets his formidable powers of observation toward middle age and mortality. These powers of observation have never been sharper, and his ability to shock readers into laughter unparalleled. But much of the comedy here is born out of that vertiginous moment when your own body betrays you and you realize that the story of your life is made up of more past than future.

London and the South East, by David Szalay
David Szalay

Paul Rainey, the hapless antihero at the center of this story works, miserably, in ad sales. He sells space in magazines that hardly exist, and through a fog of booze and drugs dimly perceives that he is dissatisfied with his life until a chance meeting with an old friend and fellow salesman leads to the offer of a new job. But when that offer turns out to be as misleading as Paul's own sales patter, his life is transformed in ways very much more peculiar than he ever thought possible. 

Can't we talk about something more pleasant, by Roz Chast
Roz Chast

In her first memoir, Roz Chast brings her signature wit to the topic of aging parents. Spanning the last several years of their lives and told through four-color cartoons, family photos, and documents, and a with narrative as rife with laughs as it is with tears, Chast's memoir is both comfort and comic relief for anyone experiencing the life-altering loss of elderly parents.

Sisters, by Lily Tuck
Lily Tuck

Tuck's unnamed narrator lives with her new husband, his two teenagers, and the unbanishable presence of his first wife – known only as she. Obsessed with her, our narrator moves through her days presided over by the all-too-real ghost of the first marriage, fantasizing about how the first wife lives her life. Will the narrator ever equal she intellectually, or ever forget the betrayal that lies between them? And what of the secrets between her husband and she, from which the narrator is excluded? Tuck gives a very different portrait of marital life, exposing the intricacies and scandals of a new marriage sprung from betrayal. 

This is the Story of a Happy Marriage, by Ann Patchett
Ann Patchett

Offering an invitation into her personal life, the noted author shares the stories of the people, places, ideals, and art to which she has remained indelibly committed. 

Shaun Tan

A wordless graphic novel that beautifully conveys the bewildering experience of arriving in a new country as an immigrant.

David Grann

Each of the stories in this collection reveals a hidden and often dangerous world, pivoting around the gravitational pull of obsession and the captivating personalities of those caught in its grip. There is the world's foremost expert on Sherlock Holmes, found dead in mysterious circumstances; an arson sleuth trying to prove that a man about to be executed is innocent; and sandhogs racing to complete the dangerous job of building New York City's water tunnels before the old system collapses. Throughout, Grann's accounts display the power--and often the willful perversity--of the human spirit, a mosaic of ambition, madness, passion, and folly.

There there, by Tommy Orange
Tommy Orange

Tommy Orange's first novel is a wondrous and shattering portrait of an America few of us have ever seen. This is a multi-generational, relentlessly paced story about violence and recovery, hope and loss, identity and power, dislocation and communion, and the beauty and despair woven into the history of a nation and its people. 

The Home Place, by J. Drew Lanham
J. Drew Lanham

A big-hearted, unforgettable memoir by ornithologist Drew Lanham who falls in love with the natural world around him. As his passion takes flight, however, he begins to ask what it means to be "the rare bird, the oddity" – to find joy and freedom in the same land his ancestors were tied to by forced labor, and then to be a black man in a profoundly white field. By turns angry, funny, elegiac, and heartbreaking, this is a remarkable meditation on nature and belonging.