We Recommend

The Hunger, by Alma Katsu
Alma Katsu

A tense and gripping reimagining of one of America's most haunting human disasters: the Donner Party with a supernatural turn.

in Defense of Food, by Michael Pollan
Michael Pollan

Humans used to know how to eat well, Pollan argues, but the balanced dietary lessons that were once passed down through generations have been confused and distorted by food industry marketers, nutritional scientists, and journalists. Looking at what science does and does not know about diet and health, he proposes a new way to think about what to eat, informed by ecology and tradition rather than by the nutrient-by-nutrient approach.

The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry, by Gabrielle Zevin
Gabrielle Zevin

When his most prized possession, a rare collection of Poe poems, is stolen, bookstore owner A. J. Fikry begins isolating himself from his friends, family and associates before receiving a mysterious package that compels him to remake his life.

The Diary of a Bookseller, by Shaun Bythell
Shaun Bythell

A cranky Scottish bookseller records a year in the life of his shop. This entertaining and dryly humorous memoir covers one year in the life of the Bookshop, Bythell's used-bookstore in a drafty, leaky stone house in Wigtown, Scotland.

Be My Love, by Kit Pearson
Kit Pearson

The pains and joys of friendship and family play out over a summer on Kingfisher Island, where young Maisie may finally discover the strength she needs to find the same peace that the island has brought her during all the previous summers she has spent there.

The Bad-ass Librarians of Timbuktu, by Joshua Hammer
Joshua Hammer

Hammer describes how a group of Timbuktu librarians enacted a daring plan to smuggle the city's great collection of rare Islamic manuscripts away from the threat of destruction at the hands of Al Quaeda militants to the safety of southern Mali.

The Song of Achilles, by Madeline Miller
Madeline Miller

Patroclus, an awkward young prince, follows Achilles into the Trojan war, little knowing that the years that follow will test everything they have learned, everything they hold dear. And that, before he is ready, he will be forced to surrender his friend to the hands of Fate. 

Siege: Trump Under Fire, by Michael Wolff
Michael Wolff

Michael Wolff provides an alarming and indelible portrait of a president like no other. Surrounded by enemies and blind to his peril, he says Trump is a raging, self-destructive inferno – and the most divisive leader in American history.

A Place to Belong, by Cynthia Kadohata
Cynthia Kadohata

Twelve-year-old Hanako and her family, reeling from their confinement in an internment camp, renounce their American citizenship to move to Hiroshima, a city devastated by the atomic bomb dropped by Americans.

The Education of an Idealist, by Samantha Power
Samantha Power

In her memoir, Power offers an urgent response to the question "What can one person do?" – and a call for a clearer eye, a kinder heart, and a more open and civil hand in our politics and daily lives. The book traces Power's distinctly American journey from immigrant to war correspondent to the presidential Cabinet of Barack Obama.

Borne, by Jeff Vandermeer
Jeff Vandermeer

In a ruined, nameless city of the future, a woman named Rachel, who makes her living as a scavenger, finds a small green lump of a creature she names "Borne" entangled in the fur of Mord, a gigantic, despotic bear. Mord once prowled the corridors of the biotech organization known as the Company, which lies at the outskirts of the city, until he was experimented on, grew large, learned to fly and broke free. Driven insane by his torture at the hands of the Company, Mord terrorizes the city.

On Fire: The (Burning) Case For A Green New Deal, by Naomi Klein
Naomi Klein

Delving into topics ranging from the clash between ecological time and our culture of "perpetual now," to the soaring history of humans' ability to change rapidly in the face of grave threat, to rising white supremacy and fortressed borders as a form of "climate barbarism," this is a call to action for a planet on the brink. Above all, Klein underscores how we can still rise to the existential challenge of the crisis if we are willing to transform our systems that are producing it, making clear how the battle for a greener world is indistinguishable from the fight for our lives.

The Widow's House, by Carol Goodman
Carol Goodman

A harrowing tale of psychological suspense set in a creepy mansion with a dark and anguished past. 

Blowout: Corrupted Democracy, Rogue State Russia, and the Richest, Most Destructive Industry on Earth, by Rachel Maddow
Rachel Maddow

Blowout offers a dark, serpentine, riveting tour of the unimaginably lucrative and corrupt oil-and-gas industry. With her trademark black humour, Maddow takes us on a switchback journey around the globe-from Oklahoma City to Siberia to Equatorial Guinea – exposing the greed and incompetence of Big Oil and Gas.

Pet, by Akwaeke Emezi
Akwaeke Emezi

There are no monsters anymore. In the city of Lucille, Jam and her best friend, Redemption, have grown up with this lesson all their life. Then Jam meets Pet, a creature made of horns and colors and claws, who emerges from one of her mother's paintings and a drop of Jam's blood. Pet has come to hunt a monster –  and the shadow of something grim lurks in Redemption's house. How do you save the world from monsters if no one will admit they exist?

On the Plain of Snakes: A Mexican Journey, by Paul Theroux
Paul Theroux

Legendary travel writer Paul Theroux fearlessly drives the entire length of the US-Mexico border, then goes deep into the hinterland on the back roads of Chiapas and Oaxaca to uncover the rich, layered world behind today's brutal headlines.

Belzebubs, by JP Ahonen
JP Ahonen

Belzebubs is a "trve kvlt mockumentary" focusing on the everyday challenges of family life: raising kids, running a small business, and making time for worship. Except the kids are named Lilith and Leviathan, the business is a black-metal band, and the worship … isn't exactly aimed upstairs.

Far from Land: The Mysterious Lives of Seabirds, by Michael Brooke
Michael Brooke

The lives and activities of seabirds as you've never seen them before. This beautifully illustrated book takes you on a breathtaking journey around the globe to reveal where these birds actually go when they roam the sea, the tactics they employ to traverse vast tracts of ocean, the strategies they use to evade threats, and more.

Giant Days Volume 11, by John Allison
John Allison

The end of university is upon BFFs Daisy, Esther, and Susan. Between Halloween run-ins with Daisy's dreaded (dreadful) ex, part-time gigs at a shady pop-up Christmas market, Esther dating a tech-bro, and Susan attempting to be romantic, there's still plenty to learn and more than enough misadventure to squeeze in before it's time to don caps and gowns.

Black Rabbit Hall, by Eve Chase
Eve Chase

Amber Alton knows that the hours pass differently at Black Rabbit Hall, her London family's country estate. Summers there are perfect, timeless. Not much ever happens, until it does. More than three decades later, Lorna is determined to be married within the grand walls of Pencraw Hall, known as Black Rabbit Hall among the locals. But as she's drawn deeper into the overgrown grounds, half-buried memories of her mother begin to surface and Lorna soon finds herself ensnared within the manor's labyrinthine history, overcome with an insatiable need for answers about her own past and that of the once-happy family whose memory still haunts the estate.

The Ruin, by Dervla McTiernan
Dervla McTiernan

It's been twenty years since Irish Garda Cormac Reilly discovered the body of Hilaria Blake in her crumbling Georgian home. But he's never forgotten the two children he found in her house. Twenty years later one of them is found dead – a suspected suicide and Reilly is the detective assigned with the re-investigation of a seemingly accidental overdose twenty years ago.

A Lush and Seething Hell, by John Jacobs
John Horner Jacobs

The author turns his fertile imagination to the evil that breeds within the human soul with this brilliant mix of the psychological and supernatural in two short novels. One is centered on the journal of a poet-in-exile and his failed attempts at translating a maddening text  – told by a young woman trying to come to grips with a country that nearly devoured itself. In another, a librarian discovers a recording from the Deep South – which may be the musical stylings of the Devil himself.

Olive, again, by Elizabeth Strout
Elizabeth Strout

Elizabeth Strout has achieved greatness by brilliantly laying bare the inner lives of ordinary people, by focusing on the small moments of connection which can dislodge lifelong grief and longing, and unite her characters through moments of transcendent grace. Olive, Again is another lasting work of fiction by this remarkable writer, and a cause for celebration among readers everywhere.

Genius of birds, by Jennifer Ackerman
Jennifer Ackerman

Like humans, many birds have enormous brains relative to their size. Although small, bird brains are packed with neurons that allow them to punch well above their weight. Ackerman explores the newly discovered brilliance of birds and how it came about. As she travels around the world to the most cutting-edge frontiers of research, she not only tells the story of the recently uncovered genius of birds, but also delves deeply into the latest findings about the bird brain itself that are revolutionizing our view of what it means to be intelligent.

Genius of birds, by Jennifer Ackerman
Jennifer Ackerman

Like humans, many birds have enormous brains relative to their size. Although small, bird brains are packed with neurons that allow them to punch well above their weight. Ackerman explores the newly discovered brilliance of birds and how it came about. As she travels around the world to the most cutting-edge frontiers of research, she not only tells the story of the recently uncovered genius of birds, but also delves deeply into the latest findings about the bird brain itself that are revolutionizing our view of what it means to be intelligent.