We Recommend

Something Wicked This Way Comes, by Ray Bradbury
Ray Bradbury

A strange carnival brings terror to the population of a small midwestern town. It rolls in sometime after the midnight hour on a chill Midwestern October eve, ushering in Halloween a week before its time. A calliope's shrill siren song beckons to all with a seductive promise of dreams and youth regained.  And two inquisitive boys standing precariously on the brink of adulthood will soon discover the secret of the satanic rare show's smoke, mazes, and mirrors, as they learn all too well the heavy cost of wishes, and the stuff of nightmare..

In Cold Blood, by Truman Capote
Truman Capote

On November 15, 1959, in the small town of Holcomb, Kansas, four members of the Clutter family were savagely murdered by blasts from a shotgun. There was no apparent motive for the crime, and there were almost no clues. As Truman Capote reconstructs the murder and the investigation that led to the capture, trial, and execution of the killers, he generates both mesmerizing suspense and astonishing empathy. In Cold Blood is a work that transcends its moment, yielding poignant insights into the nature of American violence.

Scarborough, by Catherinine Hernandez
Catherinine Hernandez

A poignant, multi-voiced novel about life in the inner city. Scarborough is a low-income, culturally diverse neighbourhood east of Toronto, the fourth largest city in North America. Like many inner-city communities, it suffers under the weight of poverty, drugs, crime, and urban blight. Scarborough the novel employs a multitude of voices to tell the story of a tight-knit neighbourhood under fire.

Charlotte Bronte: A Fiery Life, by Claire Harman
Claire Harman

A groundbreaking biography that places an obsessive, unrequited love at the heart of the writer's life story, transforming her from the tragic figure we have previously known into a smoldering Jane Eyre.

No One Can Pronounce My Name, by Rakesh Satyal
Rakesh Satyal

In an American suburb, a community of newcomers has settled into living between Eastern and Western cultures. Harit, a lonely Indian immigrant lives with his mother who mourns the death of Harit's sister. In a misguided attempt to keep both himself and his mother sane, Harit has taken to dressing up in a sari every night to pass as his sister. Meanwhile, Ranjana, also an Indian immigrant, has just seen her only child off to college. Worried that her husband has begun an affair, she seeks solace by writing paranormal romances in secret. When Harit and Ranjana's paths cross, they begin a strange yet necessary friendship that brings to light their own passions and fears.

The Arab of the Future: A graphic memoir, by Riad Sattouf
Riad Sattouf

In striking, virtuoso graphic style that captures both the immediacy of childhood and the fervor of political idealism, Riad Sattouf recounts his nomadic childhood growing up in rural France, Gaddafi's Libya, and Assad's Syria – but always under the roof of his father, a Syrian Pan-Arabist who drags his family along in his pursuit of grandiose dreams for the Arab nation. Brimming with life and dark humor, this book reveals the truth and texture of one eccentric family in an absurd Middle East. In Volume 2 Riad, now settled in his fathers hometown of Horms, gets to go to school, where he dedicates himself to becoming a true Syrian in the country of the dictator Hafez Al-Assad.

Memory's last breath, by Gerda Saunders
Gerda Saunders

Based on the "field notes" she keeps in her journal, this is Saunders' astonishing window into a life distorted by dementia. She writes about shopping trips cut short by unintentional shoplifting, car journeys derailed when she loses her bearings, and the embarrassment of forgetting what she has just said to a room of university colleagues. Coping with the complications of losing short-term memory, Saunders nonetheless embarks on a personal investigation of the brain and its mysteries, examining science and literature, and immersing herself in vivid memories of her childhood in South Africa.

Kay's Lucky Coin variety, by Anne Y.K. Choi
Anne Y.K. Choi

Mary, a Korean girl growing up with her brother above her parents' convenience store in 1980s Toronto, is caught between the traditional culture of her parents and her desire to be a Canadian.

Multiculturalism:examining the politics of integration, by Charles Taylor
Charles Taylor

In this book Charles Taylor offers a historically informed, philosophical perspective on what is at stake in the demand made by many people for recognition of their particular group identities by public institutions. His thoughts serve as a point of departure for commentaries by other leading thinkers. In his essay Taylor compares two competing forms of liberal government: one that protects no particular culture but ensures the rights and welfare of all its citizens, and one that nurtures a particular culture yet also protects the basic rights and welfare of nonconforming citizens. Questioning the desirability and possibility of the first conception, Taylor defends a version of the second.

The dancehall years, by Joan Haggerty
Joan Haggerty

This family saga begins one summer on Bowen Island and in Vancouver during the Depression and moves through Pearl Harbour, the evacuation of the Japanese and three generations into the 1980s. Gwen Killam is a child whose idyllic island summers are obliterated by the war and consequent dramatically changed behavior of the adults around her. Her swimming teacher, Takumi, disappears along with his parents. The Lower Mainland is in blackout, and Gwen’s beloved Aunt Isabelle painfully realizes she must make an unthinkable sacrifice. The island’s dance hall, a well-known destination for both soldiers on leave and summer picnickers, becomes the emotional landmark for time passing and time remembered.

Eleanor Oliphant is completely fine, by Gail Honeyman
Gail Honeyman

Quirky Eleanor struggles to relate to other people and lives a very solitary life. When she and the new work IT guy happen to be walking down the street together, they witness an elderly man collapse on the sidewalk and suddenly Eleanor's orderly routines are disrupted. A novel about loneliness and how a little bit of kindness can change a person forever.

The Promise of Canada, by Charlotte Grey
Charlotte Gray

What does it mean to be a Canadian? What great ideas have changed our country? An award-winning writer casts her eye over 150 years of Canadian history.

The Changeling, Victor D. LaValle
Victor D. LaValle

A wildly imaginative, dark fairy tale of one man's thrilling odyssey through an enchanted world to find his wife, who has disappeared after having seemingly committed an unforgivable act of violence.

Mozart's Starling, by Lyanda Lynn Haupt
Lyanda Lynn Haupt

In 1784 Mozart met a flirtatious little starling in a Viennese shop who sang an improvised version of the theme from his Piano Concerto no. 17 in G major. Sensing a kindred spirit in the plucky young bird, Mozart bought him and took him home to be a family pet. For three years, the starling lived with Mozart, influencing his work and serving as his companion, distraction, consolation, and muse. Two centuries later, seasoned birder and naturalist Lyanda Haupt rescues a baby starling and found herself enchanted by the same intelligence and playful spirit that had so charmed her favorite composer.

The Heaviness of Things That Float, by Jennifer Manuel
Jennifer Manuel

Bernadette has spent the last forty years living alone on the periphery of a remote West Coast First Nations reserve, serving as a nurse for the community. Only weeks from retirement, she finds herself unsettled, with no immediate family of her own. And then a shocking announcement crackles over the VHF radio of the remote medical outpost: Chase Charlie, the young man that Bernadette loves like a son, is missing.

How to be a Woman, by Caitlin Moran
Caitlin Moran

Though they have the vote and the Pill and haven't been burned as witches since 1727, life isn't exactly a stroll down the catwalk for modern women. They are beset by uncertainties and questions. Caitlin Moran interweaves provocative observations on women's lives with laugh-out-loud funny scenes from her own; from the riot of adolescence to her development as a writer, wife, and mother. With rapier wit, Moran slices right to the truth and lays bare the reasons why female rights and empowerment are essential issues not only for women today but also for society itself.

The Berlin Project, by Gregory Benford
Gregory Benford

Karl Cohen, a chemist and mathematician who is part of The Manhattan Project, has discovered an alternate solution for creating the uranium isotope needed to cause a chain reaction: U-235. After convincing General Groves of his new method, Cohen and his team of scientists work at Oak Ridge preparing to have a nuclear bomb ready to drop by the summer of 1944 in an effort to stop the war on the western front. What ensues is an altered account of World War II in this taut thriller. Combining fascinating science with intimate and true accounts of several members of The Manhattan Project, The Berlin Project is an astounding novel that reimagines history and what could have happened if the atom bomb was ready in time to stop Hitler from killing millions of people.

I contain multitudes, by Ed Yong
Ed Yong

In this astonishing book, Ed Yong takes us on a grand tour through our microbial partners and introduces us to the scientists on the front lines of discovery. Every animal, whether human, squid, or wasp, is home to millions of bacteria and other microbes. Ed Yong, whose humor is as evident as his erudition, prompts us to look at ourselves and our animal companions in a new light – less as individuals and more as the interconnected, interdependent multitudes we assuredly are. This book will change both our view of nature and our sense of where we belong in it.

Marriage of a thousand lies, by SJ Sindu
S.J.Sindu

Lakshmi, called Lucky, is an unemployed millennial programmer in a sham marriage with Krishna, an editor for a greeting card company. Both are secretly gay. They present their conservative Sri Lankan-American families with a heterosexual front, while each dates on the side. When Lucky's grandmother has a nasty fall, Lucky returns to her mother's home to act as caretaker and unexpectedly reconnects with her childhood best friend and first lover, Nisha. Nisha has agreed to an arranged marriage with a man she doesn't know, but finds herself attracted to her old friend. And Lucky, an outsider no matter what choices she makes, is pushed to the breaking point.

Aurora, by Kim Stanley Robinson
Kim Stanley Robinson

Generations after leaving earth, a starship draws near to the planet that may serve as a new home world for those on board. But the journey has brought unexpected changes and their best laid plans may not be enough to survive.

Thick as thieves, by Megan Turner
Megan Turner

Kamet, a secretary and slave to his Mede master, has the ambition and the means to become one of the most powerful people in the Empire. But with a whispered warning the future he envisioned is wrenched away, and he is forced onto a very different path.

Undoing project, by Michael Lewis
Michael Lewis

Forty years ago, Israeli psychologists Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky wrote a series of breathtakingly original studies undoing assumptions about the decision-making process. Their papers showed the ways in which the human mind erred, systematically, when forced to make judgments about uncertain situations. Their work created the field of behavioral economics, revolutionized big data studies, advanced evidence-based medicine, led to a new approach to government regulation, and made much of Michael Lewis's own work possible.

Too Cool to be Forgotten, by Alex Robinson
Alex Robinson

Middle-aged Andy Wicks has tried everything to quit smoking – from going cold turkey, to the latest choices in patches and nicotine chewing gums, so he figures he'll give this hypnosis thing a try. What's the worst that could happen? Unfortunately he's dealt a fate worse than death – high school!

One Night Only, by Ken Reid
Ken Reid

From the beer league to the minor league, from coast to coast, hockey players often say they'd give anything to play just one game in the NHL. One Night Only brings you the stories of 41 men who lived the dream, only to see it fade away almost as quickly as it arrived. Ken Reid talks to players who had one game and one game only in the National Hockey League, including the most famous single-gamer of them all: the Coach himself, Don Cherry.

A Gentleman in Moscow, by Amor Towles
Amor Towles

A Russian aristocrat, Count Alexander Rostov, is put under house arrest at the Metropol hotel. He makes the best of his restricted surroundings and reduced circumstances for decades with the help of the Metropol's staff and guests – putting his skills as a gentleman to use in creative ways. A gentle, telling and often poignant view of the changes to Russian society after the Russian Revolution.